Session Organizer


Accidental introductions of biocontrol agents: positive and negative aspects

Donald C. Weber

USDA Agricultural Research Service
Invasive Insect Biocontrol & Behavior Laboratory
Beltsville, Maryland
USA
Don.Weber@ars.usda.gov

Tim Haye

CABI
Rue des Grillons 1
Delémont
Switzerland
T.Haye@cabi.org


How well do we understand non-target impacts in arthropod biological control?

Mark S. Hoddle

University of California
Department of Entomology
Riverside, California
USA
mark.hoddle@ucr.edu

Roy van Driesche

Dept of Evironmental Conservation
Holdsworth Hall, UMASS
Amherst, Massachusetts
USA
vandries@cns.umass.edu


Frontiers in forest insect control

Brett Hurley

FABI, University of Pretoria
Pretoria
South Africa
brett.hurley@fabi.up.ac.za

Simon Lawson

University of Sunshine Coast
Sippy Downs
Australia


The role of native and alien natural enemy diversity in biological control

Tania Zaviezo

Universidad Católica de Chile
Santiago
Chile
tzaviezo@uc.cl

Audrey Grez

Universidad de Chile
Santa Rosa 11735
Santiago
Chile
agrez@uchile.cl


Socio-economic impacts of biological control

Steven E. Naranjo

USDA-ARS
Arid-Land Agricultural Research Center
Maricopa, Arizona
USA
Steve.Naranjo@ARS.USDA.GOV

Joerg Romeis

Agroscope
Institute for Sustainability Sciences
Zurich
Switzerland
joerg.romeis@agroscope.admin.ch


Maximizing opportunities for biological control in Asia's rapidly changing agro-environments

Kris A.G. Wyckhuys

International Center for Tropical Agriculture CIAT –
Asia Regional Office
Hanoi
Vietnam
k.wyckhuys@cgiar.org

Yanhui Lu

Institute of Plant Protection
China Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Beijing
P.R. China
yhlu@ippcaas.cn


Successes and uptake of arthropod biological control in developing countries

Ulrich Kuhlmann

CABI
Rues des Grillons 1
2800 Delémont
Switzerland
u.kuhlmann@cabi.org

Matthew Cock

CABI
Bakeham Lane
Egham, TW20 9TY
UK
m.cock@cabi.org


The importance of  pre and post release genetics in biological control

Richard Stouthamer

University of California
Department of Entomology
Riverside, California
richard.stouthamer@ucr.edu

Stephen Goldson

AgResearch Limited
Christchurch
New Zealand
stephen.goldson@agresearch.co.nz


Exploring the compatibility of arthropod biological control and pesticides: models and data

John E. Banks

California State University Monterey Bay
Seaside, California
USA
jebanks@csumb.edu

John D. Stark

Washington State University
Research and Extension Center
Washington
USA
starkj@wsu.edu


Biological control based Integrated Pest Management: does it work?

Mohamad Roff

MARDI
Selangor
Malaysia
roff@mardi.gov.my

Fang-Hao Wan

Institute of Plant Protection
Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences
Beijing
China
wanfanghao@caas.cn/wanfanghaocaas@163.com


Regulation and access and benefit sharing policies relevant for classical biological control approaches

Peter Mason

Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Ottawa, Ontario
Canada
peter.mason@agr.gc.ca

Barbara Barratt

AgResearch Limited
Mosgiel
New Zealand
barbara.barratt@agresearch.co.nz


Weed and arthropod biological control: mutual benefits and challenges

Hariet Hinz

CABI
Rue des Grillons 1
2800 Delémont
Switzerland
H.Hinz@cabi.org

George Heimpel

Department of Entomology
University of Minnesota
St. Paul; Minnesota
U.S.A.
heimp001@umn.edu


Biocontrol Marketplace I

Yelitza Colmenarez

CABI
Botucatu
Brazil
y.colmenarez@cabi.org

R. Srinivasan

World Vegetable Center
Shanhua, Tainan
Taiwan
srini.ramasamy@worldveg.org


Biocontrol Marketplace II

Sunday Ekesi

ICIPE – International Centre of Insect Physiology & Ecology
Nairobi
Kenya
sekesi@icipe.org

Wai-Hong Loke

CABI
Selangor
Malaysia
w.loke@cabi.org